These collections involve the investigation of long-term changes in successional relationships among species comprising the various communities in the Williams College-owned Hopkins Forest and the extent to which natural and human-use disturbances have played a role in shaping the present patterns of communities and ecosystems. Deed history, oral history, local history, archival collections, and other socioeconomic data are highlighted on this site and complement the rich ecological data of Hopkins Forest.

About

The Henry Art Collections include extensive information concerning the College’s Hopkins Memorial Forest (HMF) including maps, aerial photographs, oral histories of people associated with the HMF and its predecessor Buxton Farms, photographs spanning the period 1900 to present, deed histories of the HMF from the settlement of the town in 1753, and extensive archives of the Rosenburg family and the U.S. Forest Service – Amos Lawrence Hopkins Experimental Forest. To learn more about the HMF Permanent Plot System, follow this link.

Professor Henry Art

Dr. Henry Art’s research involves the investigation of long-term changes in the various plant communities in the Hopkins Forest, and the extent to which natural and human-use disturbances have played a role in shaping the present patterns of these communities and ecosystems. This study has involved the collection of data from a grid of permanent monitoring plots initiated in 1935 by the U.S. Forest Service when they operated the facility. Deed history, oral history, and other socioeconomic data have complemented the ecological databases on the Hopkins Forest. Professor Art has an undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College and earned a Ph.D. degree in forest ecology from Yale University. He has taught in the Environmental Studies Program and Biology Department at Williams College since 1970.